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Organs





Images from 1918 Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body from Bartleby.com

Organs Any V.0° (Any(KD))


Description

All major organs are all found in the compass angle that relates to their associated Five Element and at V.0° in their respective energetic boxes. While each organ has a separate function, all organs share the purpose of holding energy. Organs related to the digestive tract are called Yang organs in Chinese medicine. They break down the energy of food and transform it into usable energy, releasing unusable parts as stool or urine. These organs include the stomach, gallbladder, small intestine, large intestine, and bladder (not exactly digestive tract as defined in the West, but still involved in transforming or releasing what we need and don't need).


The other organs, known as Yin organs in Chinese medicine, predominantly focus on blood flow and filtration. The heart organ controls blood flow. The kidneys filter the blood, control fluid salinity, and generate urine. The lungs add oxygen to the blood and release carbon dioxide – oxygen being an essential ingredient for creating energy throughout every cell of the body. And the liver organ filters the blood for dangerous substances, controls fat absorption, and regulates blood clotting, among a host of other functions. The spleen also filters blood, but in this case for foreign pathogens.


In the Western world, the spleen serves a function of filtering the blood and is part of the immune system. In the Eastern world, the spleen is related to all aspects of digestion and is closely tied together with the pancreas gland, which serves to maintain healthy blood sugar by balancing hunger, the creation of fat, and its breakdown.


In Chinese medicine, the heart supports the spleen, which in turn supports the lungs, which then support the kidneys, which support the liver. The liver in turn completes the circle by supporting the heart. This is called the Generating Cycle. The lungs control the liver, which controls the spleen, which controls the kidneys, which control the heart, which controls the lungs. This is called the Controlling Cycle. When an organ is weak, it can be supported by strengthening its “mother” in the cycle. So for weak lungs, one can strengthen the spleen. When an organ is too strong, it can be kept in check via its controlling organ. So if the lungs are too strong, strengthening the heart controls it.


Sometimes you have a problem in an organ because its controlling organ is too strong. Sometimes you have a problem in an organ when its mother organ or its controlling organ is too weak. Sometimes you have a problem in an organ when it is too strong or too weak because of one's constitutional state. So, when you see a problem with an organ, especially a problem that does not improve with treatment, consider these relationships as possible roots to the problem.


The Yang organs also have generating and controlling relationships. The large intestine is the mother of the bladder; the bladder is the mother of the gallbladder; the gallbladder is the mother of the small intestine; the small intestine is the mother of the stomach; the stomach is the mother of the large intestine. The controlling cycle is as follows: the large intestine controls the gallbladder which controls the stomach which controls
Images from 1918 Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body from Bartleby.com
the bladder which controls the small intestine which controls the large intestine.


When a problem arises in an organ, think systemically. When you change a system, all of the related parts shift. This is very different from the Western reductionist model which focuses solely on the diseased organ to cure the problem.


Element



Organ

Element

Lung

Metal (Yin)

Large Intestine

Metal (Yang)

Kidney

Water (Yin)

Bladder

Water (Yang)

Liver

Wood (Yin)

Gallbladder

Wood (Yang)

Heart

Fire (Yin)

Small Intestine

Fire (Yang)

Images from 1918 Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body from Bartleby.com

Spleen

Earth (Yin)

Stomach

Earth (Yang)


Tissue Treatment

Yin Organs

Yang Organs

Lungs


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Earth + Water + Metal

Earth: Water + Metal


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Metal

Earth: Metal + S.Fire or N.Water

Large Intestine


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Earth + Water + Metal

Earth: Water + Metal


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Metal + E.Wood

Earth: Metal + Water

Kidneys


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Earth + Water

Earth: Water


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Metal

Earth: Water + S.Fire or N.Water

Bladder


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Earth + Water

Earth: Water


Advanced Perfusion:


Images from 1918 Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body from Bartleby.com

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + W.Metal or E.Wood

Earth: Water

Liver


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Earth + Wood + Water

Earth: Water + Wood


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Wood

Earth: Wood + S.Fire or N.Water

Gallbladder


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Earth + Wood + Water

Earth: Water + Wood


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Wood + W.Metal

Earth: Wood + Fire

Heart


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Fire + Water

Earth: Water + Fire


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Fire

Earth: Fire + S.Fire or N.Water

Small Intestine


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Fire + Water

Earth: Water + Fire


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Fire + W.Metal or E.Wood

Earth: Fire

Spleen


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Earth + Water

Earth: Earth + Water


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Earth

Earth: Earth + S.Fire or N.Water

Stomach


Basic Perfusion:

Heaven: Fire + Water

Man: Earth + Water

Earth: Earth + Water


Advanced Perfusion:

Heaven: Earth + Water

Man: Water + Earth + W.Metal or E.Wood

Earth: Earth + Water


Images from 1918 Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body from Bartleby.com


Emotions

All organs contain the emotion of confidence from the vertical emotion. However, each organ has a compass emotion that is unique.


Organ

Emotion

Lungs

Confidence in Integrity/Protection

Large Intestine

Confidence in Expectations/Judgment

Kidneys

Confidence in confidence/structure

Bladder

Confidence in Willpower

Liver

Confidence in Action/growth

Gallbladder

Confidence in Deciding/strategy/transforming

Heart

Confidence in Love

Small Intestine

Confidence in Unconditional love

Spleen

Confidence in Trust


Images from 1918 Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body from Bartleby.com

Stomach

Confidence in Power


Closely Interrelated Tissues

Please review the Five Element associations with each organ as well as all of the tissues with the same Elemental associations. All tissues rely on healthy blood flow and break down if this is compromised. Also look at nerves when a problem is worse with stress, such as diarrhea. Diseases in organs often manifest in tissues within tissues.


Notes From Ethan's Clinic

In the clinic, I see diseases in every organ daily. They are too numerous to recount. A technique I love for healing organs is the Multi-Dimensional treatment to heal from years of imbalance.


In Fu Xi Wen, an organ is not just the physical organ that is recognized by Western doctors. Rather, an organ relates to an area of influence all around a physical organ. In the case of the Heart organ, for instance, it is important that you differentiate the heart muscle, which is cardiac muscle, from the heart organ, which contains all of the tissues of the middle chest. The entire area is the organ in Fu Xi Wen, as any problem in the tissues of that area can harm the heart. The same is true for every other organ as well. Reducing things to the physical boundary of the organ totally ignores the physiological system in which it resides. Sure, you could have difficulty breathing because the lung itself is unhealthy. But you can also have difficulty breathing because the rib above it is broken or because the intercostal muscles between the ribs are strained. In each case, the lungs suffer.

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Images on homepage from: 1918 Gray's Anatomy of the Human Body from Bartleby.com
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